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  Anglo Nubian Goat

 

Who's That

 

 

The Anglo-Nubian goat originated from the crossing of U.K. bred goats and others imported from the East. From the end of the 19th century, goats were carried on P & O steamers on their homeward voyages to provide a fresh milk supply for the infant passengers and when the boats docked in London, the lop eared and “ Roman ” nosed eastern goats were eagerly bought by interested goat keepers. They were mated with goats in the U.K. and the resulting cross-bred animals were exhibited for the first time at Crystal Palace in 1875 under the names “English & Abyssinian” and “English & Indian”. The name “Anglo-Nubian” was given to the cross bred goat in about 1893. At the turn of the century, four males were brought from the Jumna Pari and Chitral districts of India and from Nubia in the Middle East. These were important in Anglo-Nubian history, siring between them 101 of the first Anglo Nubians to be registered when the British Goat Society opened the relevant Herd Book section in 1910. The present day breed contains the result of crossing Eastern and English with a little Swiss and other bloods and is one of the most popular breeds, with over 1000 kids being registered annually.

Hurstpier Cinnamon

 Hurstpier Cinnamon

 

 

The ideal Anglo-Nubian now is an alert, well-balanced animal, standing strongly and proudly and with a supercilious look on its face. Two major distinguishing features are the long pendulous ears reaching further than the nose when   measured against it and the markedly convex nose.Compared with other breeds, the Anglo-Nubian does not produce the very large quantities of milk, although in 1996 one did produce 8.25kg in a recognised milking competition. However, the milk is generally higher in both butterfat and protein than the other breeds, and for this reason it is of great interest to cheese makers. The addition of even a small proportion of Anglo-Nubian milk will increase cheese yield, and it is also ideal for yoghurt production.

 Barruths Burbon

 Barruths Burbon 

 

 

It is the largest of the dairy breeds and is well suited to meat production, the kids growing quickly and putting on weight easily. Moreover, many animals of the breed are prolific, and well-managed dams often give birth to triplets, quadruplets and even quintuplets. Overseas, Anglo-Nubians have been successfully crossed with native goats to improve yields of milk and meat; it is a very useful dual-purpose animal. Its capacity for adapting to hot climates has resulted in demand for stock for export to the Middle East, South America and the Caribbean Islands.